Pop Culture or Stereotypes?

Popular culture (commonly known as pop culture) is the totality of ideas, perspectives, attitudes, memes, images and other phenomena that are deemed preferred per an informal consensus within the mainstream of a given culture, especially Western culture of the early to mid 20th century and the emerging global mainstream of the late 20th and early 21st century. Heavily influenced by mass media, this collection of ideas permeates the everyday lives of the society. The term “popular culture” was coined in the 19th century or earlier to refer to the education and general “culturedness” of the lower classes, as was delivered in an address at the Birmingham Town Hall, England. The term began to assume the meaning of a culture of the lower classes separate from (and sometimes opposed to) “true education” towards the end of the century, a usage that became established by the interbellum period. The current meaning of the term, culture for mass consumption, especially originating in the United States, is established by the end of World War II. The abbreviated form “pop culture” dates to the 1960s.

A stereotype is a popular belief about specific types of individuals. The concepts of “stereotype” and “prejudice” are often confused with many other different meanings. Stereotypes are standardized and simplified conceptions of groups based on some prior assumptions. Another name for stereotyping is bias. A bias is a tendency, most of these are good like knowing to eat food instead of paper clips, but sometimes stereotyping can turn into discrimination if we misinterpret a bias and act upon it in a negative manner.

Examples:

Williamsburg
A part of Brooklyn known for its hipster population. North Williamsburg (near the L train) is generally filled with trustafarians, overpriced bars, and vintage clothing stores, where South Williamsburg (near the JMZ train) is still home to a large Hasidic and Hispanic population. According to the Urban dictionary: neigborhood in borough of brooklyn, NY, where many wealthy out of state young people move to live in overpriced filthy industrial lofts, eat organic vegetarian food, ride bikes, drink beer, spend as much money as possible to look as disheveled as possible, and pretend to be poor.

Steampunk is a sub-genre of science fiction, fantasy, alternate history, and speculative fiction that came into prominence during the 1980s and early 1990s. Steampunk involves a setting where steam power is still widely used—usually Victorian era Britain or “Wild West”-era United States—that incorporates elements of either science fiction or fantasy. Works of steampunk often feature anachronistic technology, or futuristic innovations as Victorians might have envisioned them, based on a Victorian perspective on fashion, culture, architectural style, and art. This technology includes such fictional machines as those found in the works of H. G. Wells and Jules Verne, or the contemporary authors Philip Pullman, Scott Westerfeld and China Mieville.

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