Confusing words: Overtake Takeover Take Over

o·ver·take, oʊ vərˈteɪk/ Show Spelled [oh-ver-teyk] verb, -took, -tak·en, -tak·ing.

verb (used with object)

1. to catch up with in traveling or pursuit; draw even with: By taking a cab to the next town, we managed to overtake and board the train.

2. to catch up with and pass, as in a race; move by: He overtook the leader three laps from the finish.

3. to move ahead of in achievement, production, score, etc.; surpass: to overtake all other countries in steel production.

4. to happen to or befall someone suddenly or unexpectedly, as night, a storm, or death: The pounding rainstorm overtook them just outside the city.

It can mean to go beyond something by being better, or if you’re driving to come from behind another vehicle or a person and move in front of it.

For example: You should always check your rear view mirror before you overtake another car.

Takeover as a noun is used when one organisation gains control of a company by buying most of its shares.

For example: In September 2006 Merck announced their takeover of Serono SA.

Take over as a phrasal verb means to get control of a company by buying most of its shares.

For example: Merck finally took Serono over in 2007.

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