Confusing words: used to, use to

Ninety-nine percent of the time, you’ll use “used to,” not “use to.” The following sentences are examples of how “used to” is often used: So what about the 1%? When is “use to” acceptable? Of course, if that sentence sounds awkward to you, it can also be written as “I use these two pencils to… Read More

Confusing words: Lay and Lie Part II

In general, irregular verbs are troublesome to learn. Regular verbs create their past and past participle forms by adding “d” or “ed” to the stem of their infinitives (love, loved, loved), but irregular verbs create past and past participle forms by altering their stems in unpredictable ways. A number of common irregular verbs give people… Read More

Confusing words: Thank or Thanks God it’s Friday?

“Thank God” is actually a shortened version of “Thanks be to God” which means that you are telling the others (your friends or whoever) that you are thankful to God. “Thank God” is in the same way as “Praise God”. “Thank God” is also correct because you are using “Thank” as a verb I (we)… Read More

Confusing words: into, in to, onto, on to, unto

          “On to” is similar to “in to”: “on” is an adverb and “to” is a preposition. It often appears in idiomatic and casual expressions:   Lastly, “unto” is an old, now rarely used, preposition that can basically be replaced by “to” or “until.” One of the most famous sentences that uses unto is what is commonly known… Read More

Confusing words: mugwump

Origin: The Mugwumps were Republican political activists who bolted from the United States Republican Party by supporting Democratic candidate Grover Cleveland in the United States presidential election of 1884. Theyswitched parties because they rejected the financial corruption associated with Republican candidate James G. Blaine. In a close election, the Mugwumps supposedly made the difference in… Read More